Break & Enter

According to the NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research (BOSCAR) there were 221,924 recorded incidents of theft from June 2017 to June 2018. These incidents include crimes such as break and enter, receiving stolen goods, motor vehicle theft and more. While statistics show that such crimes have declined over a 10-year period, the NSW judiciary system perceives these offences as serious crimes, which attract significant penalties.

At Benjamin Leonardo – The Defenders, we are an award winning criminal defence law firm with an impressive 90% success rate on the cases we have represented. With over 29 years of experience, our firm is home to some of Sydney’s best criminal defence lawyers who committed to achieving the most ideal outcome for our clients. If you, or someone you know has recently been charged with an offence relating to break and enter or theft, it is advised to seek legal representation immediately.

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Break, Enter & Steal

The law around break and enter is very complicated with significant penalties imposed for those who are found guilty.

Goods in Custody

As per section 527C of the Crimes Act 1900 (NSW) unlawful possession of property, otherwise known as goods in custody, is a criminal offence.

Car Stealing

Under section 154F of the Crimes Act 1900, stealing a motor vehicle or vessel is classified as a criminal offence with offenders liable to significant penalties. It may often be confused with the less serious charge of joyriding.

Receiving Stolen Goods

Under section 188 of the Crimes Act 1900, receiving stolen property is classified as a criminal offence with offenders liable to significant penalties.

Joy Riding

Under section 154A of the Crimes Act 1900, the offence of joy riding, otherwise referred to as taking a conveyance without consent is classified as a criminal offence with offenders liable to significant penalties.

Possess House Breaking Material

Section 114 of the Crimes Act 1900 (NSW) refers to the crime of being armed with intent to commit an indictable offence. This may refer to the possession of house breaking material in which may be capable of being used to commit an offence.